Wednesday, November 22, 2006

Happy Thanksgiving! Bring Out The Sweet Potato Pie!

A Time Of Thanks To God

On Thursday, we will be gathering with our families to celebrate God’s goodness to us and for His blessings upon our nation. There is much to be thankful for this year.

-We can be thankful that we live in a free democratic nation and can still worship freely.
-We are so thankful that our Lord Jesus Christ offered His life for our sins and that the Holy Spirit gives us His power to overcome the sins in our lives.
-We can be thankful that our nation is not being ravaged by street-to-street warfare with the enemies of freedom.
-We can be thankful that we can freely vote for our leaders.
-We can be thankful for our nation’s natural resources and for an economic system that enables hard-working individuals to get ahead and prosper.
-We can be thankful for the many godly Founding Fathers who devised a system of government designed to maximize individual freedom and creativity—and to protect religious freedom, free speech and freedom of conscience.
-We can be thankful for our churches, for pastors, and elders who faithfully serve the body of Christ.
-We can be thankful for our loved ones—our children, grandchildren, wives and husbands.

What are you thankful for today? God bless you and your family as Thanksgiving Day approaches.

Sincerely, The TVC Staff


President George Washington On Thanksgiving Day on October 3, 1789

WHEREAS it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favour; and Whereas both Houses of Congress have, by their joint committee, requested me "to recommend to the people of the United States a DAY OF PUBLICK THANSGIVING and PRAYER, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness:" NOW THEREFORE, I do recommend and assign THURSDAY, the TWENTY-SIXTH DAY of NOVEMBER next, to be devoted by the people of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being who is the beneficent author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be; that we may then all unite in rendering unto Him our sincere and humble thanks for His kind care and protection of the people of this country previous to their becoming a nation; for the signal and manifold mercies and the favorable interpositions of His providence in the course and conclusion of the late war; for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty which we have since enjoyed;-- for the peaceable and rational manner in which we have been enable to establish Constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national one now lately instituted;-- for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed, and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge;-- and, in general, for all the great and various favours which He has been pleased to confer upon us. And also, that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions; -- to enable us all, whether in publick or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually; to render our National Government a blessing to all the people by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed; to protect and guide all sovereigns and nations (especially such as have shewn kindness unto us); and to bless them with good governments, peace, and concord; to promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the increase of science among them and us; and, generally to grant unto all mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best. GIVEN under my hand, at the city of New-York, the third day of October, in the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine.

(signed) G. Washington

America’s First Thanksgiving

In the Fall of 1621, the Pilgrims in Plymouth, Massachusetts gathered for a holiday feast with their Indian friends to give thanks to God for surviving a harsh New England winter the year before. Nearly half the population had perished before Spring arrived. Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth has been one of the primary sources of information on the first Thanksgiving. It notes that the details about the first Thankgiving come from two documents written by Edward Winslow and William Bradford of Plimoth Plantation. According to a letter written by Winslow: "Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together, after we had gathered the fruits of our labors; they four in one day killed as much fowl, as with a little help beside, served the Company almost a week, at which time amongst other Recreations, we exercised our Arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and amongst the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five Deer, which they brought to the Plantation and bestowed on our Governor, and upon the Captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful, as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want, that we often wish you partakers of our plenty." In a book written 20 years later, William Bradford wrote: "They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty. For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercised in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion. All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees). And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides, they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports."

5 comments:

Lady Hawk said...

A blessed and happy thanksgiving to Mr. Tyger and Mr. Whit. President Washington mentions God more than President Bush!
Thank God for America and freedom!Thank God we are redeemed through His Holy Son, Jesus!

Tiger said...

Back at ya, Lady! : )

whit said...

Great minds think alike. We both found and linked to the Pilgrim Museum. Happy Thanksgiving.

whit said...

I found the Pilgrim Hall Museum link at D. James Kennedy's website.

Tiger said...

: )